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History

 

History

After the release of the serf Sigena by Emperor Heinrich III in the year 1050, “Nuorenberc” or “Craggy Mount” entered into the history books through an official document. The city grew quickly and somewhat haphazardly down the southern slope of the mount on which the city fortress stood. Trading and manual skills were at the core of Nuremberg’s economic upswing. This upswing had a secondary effect in advancing the growth of charitable foundations, a generous municipal life and an abundance of the arts and music in the area. Emperors and Lords were common visitors to Nuremberg, and often stayed for months at a time. In 1356, during the reign of Karl IV, he was so impressed by the city of Nuremberg that he decreed that every newly elected German Kaiser must hold his first parliament in the city. In 1424 Nuremberg was at the height of its power and wealth. Emperor Karl VI decreed that Nuremberg would forevermore be the depository for all imperial regalia. This European metropolis was considered to be the centre of German Humanism (Celtis, Pirckheimer, and Schedel). At this point in the history of Nuremberg, a continuous stream of science, paintings, and sculpture were created. For example, Martin Behaim designed the first Globe; Peter Henlein invented the first pocket watch. Anton Koberger employed over 100 people on his printing press. The art of poetry was brought to a new level by Hans Sachs and Hans Rosendplüt. In the workshops of wood carver Veit Stoß, stone mason Adam Kraft, the bronze castings of the Vischer family and painter Albrecht Dürer the Nuremberg art movement was advanced all over Europe.

The Thirty Years War and in the eighteenth century the discovery of an alternative trade route to the Sea greatly affected the city and its 50,000 inhabitants. Nuremberg became impoverished sinking into a long depression. The once independent imperial city was in 1806 integrated into the Bavarian Kingdom reawakening in 1835 to the sounds of the first German steam locomotive and a railway line between Nuremberg and Fuerth. The city started once more to experience growth through the reinstated entrepreneurial confidence of the Nuremberg citizens. Numerous factories and businesses developed and drove the economy with courage and strength. By 1881 Nuremberg realized its position as the “industrial heart of Bavaria” and managed to maintain this economic growth until the onset of World War II. Adolf Hitler chose, through a misunderstanding of German history Nuremberg as the most German of all German cities and the home for the "Reichsparteitage" (Empire Party Rallies). The citizens of Nuremberg paid dearly for Hitler’s choice as the city was almost completely destroyed in the final years of the Second World War. The reconstruction of the city after the so called “apocalypse” lasted many years leaving the city with an enormous financial burden. Today it is more than possible that Nuremberg could once again become “The City of the World” that it once was in the middle ages. Nuremberg is at the centre of one of the leading metropolitan areas in Europe. The city has managed however to maintain its ancient past and personal atmosphere, making it so delightful to tourists and visitors from all over the world. In the middle of a city with more than 500,000 residents one can find quaint traditional houses, impressive churches, a castle, and an old city wall that extends for more than five kilometres around the old historic city. Unique places of interest, such as the German National Museum, or the Documentation Centre, where the "Reichsparteitage" (Empire Party Rallies) were held, bring visitors from all over the world. The International Trade Exhibitions and Conferences bring professional businesspeople from all parts of the world to the city. Excellent restaurants and welcoming hotels flourish in the city of Nuremberg. This is all supported by a well developed and fully integrated transportation system. The city has annually some 2 million overnight visitors and 23 million day visitors. Nuremberg ranks within the top 10 most visited cities in Germany, and with one visit it is easy to see why.

   
      
  

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